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Research

 

UNIVERSITY RESEARCH CENTER VISION

The University Research Center (URC) as a center of excellence for functional scientific, educational, social, health, and technological researches for equitable and sustainable development in all other areas.

 

UNIVERSITY RESEARCH CENTER MISSION

Generate and disseminate quality researches and development outputs contributory to the attainment of excellence in the academic sector particularly in the arts and sciences, technical/ technological education, and health, in the business and industry sector for the attainment of national development goals, and implement impact projects to provide alternative livelihood programs and alleviate lives of the underprivileged and marginalized members of the community.

 

Research Organizational Structure

 

Proposed Projects for 2012

 

Title/Author

EDUCATION

  1. The Beliefs and Practices of Biguenos: Their Implications to Science Education, Dr. Ocarna B. Figuerres & Dr. Solita S. Banez
  1. The Teacher Induction Program (TIP) as Professional Enhancement of Newly-Hired Teachers in Ilocos Sur, Dr. Ocarna B. Figuerres & Dr. Solita S. Banez
  1. Employability of Architecture Graduates of the University of Northern Philippines, Faculty, College of Architecture
  1. Self-Concept and Emotional Stability of Household Helpers in Region I Working  in Hongkong, A. Quero &  A. Guinid
  1. Climate Literacy Among Ilocanos: An Analysis, Mario Obrero & Mariquit Obrero
  1. The Learning Styles of BSIE Students, C. Pardo & E. Galapon
  1. Performance of UNP Graduates in the Licensure Examinations (CPA, Nursing, LET, Engineering, ISW), R. Navarro et al
  1. Status and Practices of Senior Citizens in the First District of Ilocos Sur, J. T. Guinid
  1. ICT Utilization Among Secondary Science Teachers in Ilocos Sur, Dr. Erwin Cadorna  & Dr. Edelyn Cadorna
  1. Gender Responsive Capacity of Selected LGUs in Ilocos Sur, Dr. E. Cadorna & C. Velasco
  1. Productivity and Interest of Retired Faculty Members of UNP, Dr. A. Vitamog & Dr. Rolando Navarro
  1. Factors Affecting the Research Performance of Faculty Members in the University of Northern Philippines, Baby Sophia Alaibilla et al
  1. The Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4 P’s) of the Department of Social Welfare and Development in the Province of Ilocos Sur, A. Guinid
  1. Interests and Skills for Livelihood Among the Poor Families of RIC Members in the First District of Ilocos Sur, F.U. Ursulom
  1. The Community Based Tourism Projects/Programs of Vigan City, Dr. Rolando Navarro & Dr. M. Pablico
  1. Lay-og, Dr. Abaya et al
  1. UNP-LMS (Learning Management System), B. I. Lamarca, P.M.F Benzon

INDUSTRY & ENERGY

  1. The Solar Orientation of the Azotea of Vigan Ancestral Houses, Arch Fatima Nicetas R. Alonzo & Dr. Digna Jocelyn L. Abaya
  1. Acceptability of Hotels Converted from Vigan Ancestral Houses, Faculty, College of Architecture
  1. Biogas Project in Quimmarayan, Sto. Domingo, Ilocos Sur
  1. Prototyping of Mechanized Fruit Grape Pulp Muster, Dr. M. Bajet

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

  1. Utilization of Vigan Clay for High Fidelity Audio Speaker System, Redentor Rojas
  1. Disaster Preparedness in the Local Coastal Communities of Ilocos Sur, V. Gascon
  1. Awareness of Indigenous People on Climate Change, URC
  1. Climate Change Adaptation Strategies: Ilocos Sur, URC
  1. Environmental Awareness Practices and Attitude of People of Upland Municipalities of Ilocos Sur, M. Bajet et al
  1. Homemade Local Green Grape Wine: A Value Added Grape Products, Dr. M. Bajet et al

AGRI-FORESTRY & NATURAL RESOURCES

  1. Hydroponics of High Value Crops, M. Raboy et al
  1. Tissue Culture of Crops, M. Raboy, S. Banez, et al
  1. Phytochemical Analysis of the Leaves of Silag and Nutritive Value of Silag Fruit
  1. Impact of Climate Change on Agricultural Production in Region I
  1. Establishment of a Nursery of Fruit Trees, URC
  1. Silag Fruit Product Development, M. Queddeng et al

HEALTH & NUTRITION

  1. Dental Care Practices Among the Residents in the Selected Municipalities in the Province of Ilocos Sur (A Community-Based Research)
  1. Pre-Natal Practices Among Primigravida Mothers in Ilocos Sur, Ma. Linda Dumlao & Clarita M. Cariaga
  1. Adaptation to Climate Change of Women in Iloko Native Delicacy Industry, Dr. S. Banez et al

Research  Related  Activities

  1. The 2011 Statistical  Bulletin
  1. Annual  Publication of the  UNP Research Journal
  1. Publication of   R & D  Brochures and Flyers
  1. R & D  Technology   IPR
  1. Paper  presentations  of  Outputs
  1. Research & Development  Update
  1. E-Research &  Database 
  1. Research Capability  Building Seminar & Workshops
  1. Hosting of  the  ILARRDEC Working Group Meetings
  1. ILARRDEC  Membership   Contributions
  1. PSSC Membership Contribution
  1. ICIERD Membership Contribution
  1. ICIERD Hosting  & Related Activities
  1. R1HRDC   Hosting & Related Activities
  1. NOLAMRDZC Hosting & Related Activities
  1. APAFRI  Annual Contribution
  1. Research Utilization Seminars
  1. TV /Technology  Transfer
  1. PAIR Membership Contribution
  1. IAMURE Membership Contribution
  1. Participation to Trainings and Seminars

 

Journals

Indigenous Edible Flora and Fauna in the
Province of Abra

Alma B. Segismundo, MAEd
Rolando B. Navarro, Ed.D.
Jocelyn Abaya, Ed.D.

Abstract
Survey and characterization of the indigenous edible flora and fauna in the province of Abra were taken through a participatory approach with identified key informants.  Data were later presented to the community for validation. Scientific   identification was taken cared of by museum researchers at the National Museum, Manila.  Findings revealed that there were 25 species of flora belonging to 19 families, 15 species of fauna belonging to six classes, and five species of fungi. 

In order to increase awareness on the utilization of these important food crops and animals, a monograph on the indigenous edible flora and fauna of the province of Abra must be developed.  Laws on the protection, conservation, and management of these indigenous resources should also be promulgated.  Propagation of the   diminishing indigenous edible flora as claimed by the indigenous people should also be undertaken.

 

Yield Performance of Cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.)
Applied with Varying Amounts of Garlic
(Allium sativum L.) Wastes Concentrates

Floraceli R. Rodillas, MAT
Rommel V. Tabula, MAT
Jocelyn T. Puzon

 

Abstract

A field experiment was conducted in Naglaoa–an, Sto. Domingo, Ilocos Sur from January 2, 2010 to March 30, 2010. It aimed to determine the effectiveness of garlic wastes as fertilizer on the yield of cabbage and to determine which treatment gives the best result on the yield of cabbage.

The field response of F1KK cabbage was evaluated using the following treatments: T0 – control (plain water), T1 – 2 kg of soaked garlic wastes at 1 gal of plain water, T2 – 4 kg of soaked garlic wastes at 1 gal of plain water, and T3 – 6 kg of soaked garlic wastes at 1 gal of plain water. These treatments were allocated in their respective plots following the procedures in Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with three replications.

Results showed that the effect of applying 6 kg of soaked garlic wastes with 1 gal of water to F1KK cabbage is comparable to the other treatments with 4 kg of soaked garlic wastes having 1 gal of water and 2 kg of soaked garlic wastes having 1 gal of water. These promising results observed, however, were significantly better at .05 level than those obtained from F1KK cabbage applied with plain water only.

This implies that using soaked garlic wastes would lessen the burden of farmers in their farming expenses due to its most economical way of using it.

 

Science and Technology-Based Farm on Biogas Digester
for Rural Development

Lauro B. Tacbas, Ph.D.
Alfredo R. Rabena, Ph.D.
Maritess R. Raboy
Norma Esguerra, DPA
Manuel Bajet, Jr., Ed. D.

 

Abstract

The study (project) focused on the construction of a Biogas Digester at the farm of the Magsasaka Syientista, Mr. Maximo Rabanal, in Brgy. Pantay Daya, Vigan City. The objective of the study was to showcase the use of biogas using wastes of swine.

An eight cubic meter digester was designed and constructed to contain the wastes produced by 15 to 20 swine. It has a dimension of 3 m (depth) x 2 m x 2 m. Inlet and outlet of liquid wastes are positioned 2.75 m from the floor. Fresh  waste and water receptacle  were constructed  with dimensions measuring 60.96 cm x 60.96 cm, with a depth of 45.72 cm. The wastes are drained through the digester  and degraded into methane and other gases. The gases are trapped  by a gate valve outside the chamber. Sediments are collected from the bottom and air dried organic fertilizer. Effluents from the digester are directed to a second receptacle with a volume of 1.34 cubic meter that will supply  the needed organic fertilizer.

An amount of P 83,266.00 was needed in the construction of a one unit biogas. Financial analysis showed that to be able to compensate the expenses spent  for the construction of the biogas project, a 6.52 years payback period is computed. However, if the owner is to venture into a business such as bagnet production, a lesser payback period is computed (1.89 years).

This is a PCARRD (Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development) Funded Project.

 

Prototyping of a Multi-Purpose Mechanized Chopper

Manuel Bajet Jr., Ed.D.
Norma A. Esguerra, DPA

 

Abstract

The multi-purpose mechanized chopper was designed and fabricated using metalworking concepts. It has a housing frame 70 cm wide, 110 cm long, 80 cm high; with detachable spout and a rotating rotor which is mounted with eight (8) chopping blades, fifty (50) centimeters long. A 30 cm wide chute conveys the materials to be chopped to a chopping board with blades. It is powered by 7.5 hp diesel engine, the usual pump motor size for the “kuligligs” which is the popular service vehicle of most farmers nowadays. The machine could chop different farm wastes like stalks of corn, tobacco, banana, papaya, sugarcane, and rice whether fresh or dried. Its average speed is 100 kilograms in ten (10) minutes.

One unit of said prototype costs fifty three thousand nine hundred sixty six pesos (P 53,966.00), including its own 7.5 hp diesel engine, and only costs twenty nine thousand nine hundred sixty six pesos (P 29,966.000 ) without the motor.

 

Design and Development of a Gasoline-Fed Welding Machine – An Alternate for Oxy-Acetylene Welding

Nelson A. Bajet, MAT
Manuel A. Bajet Jr., Ed.D.
Norma A. Esguerra, DPA

 

Abstract

The gasoline-fed welding machine – an alternative for oxy-acetylene welding was designed and fabricated using metal working concepts.  The fume reservoir fuel tank and accessories, including welding torch assembly were fabricated.  The proposed gadget – a gasoline fed welding machine as an alternative to oxyacetylene-fed welding was conceptualized to considerably decrease the fuel consumption in welding without sacrificing the quality of the finished product with what is already acceptable to the market – the oxyacetylene-fed welding machine.

Qualitative testing were made to identify the capacity of the set-up as to the type of material connected as well as the purposed of the  welding connection, adjustments needed per type of material and purpose; observations as to the machines performance when wielding the identified materials, application to different filler rods, as well as position and motion to the torch.

Interpreting the observed results  per applied pressure and temperature, with the type of material connected, the following could be derived; light color of flame suggest a pressure of 0.5 psi (3.454KPa) and temperature close to 3149oC.  Bright/faint  red flame indicated that a pressure from 2 psi to 3 psi (13.816 to 20.724 KPa) and a temperature close to 3260oC is already attained.  Aluminum melts a 343oC And would attain a sound weld when connected to another aluminum  materials at this temperature.

The gas-fed welding machine is only capable of producing light and full red color of flames, while oxy-acetylene could produce three flame qualities, light, dull red and bright/faint red.  The machine could not weld steel material to itself, and to other materials, specifically aluminium and copper.

Technical fields where gasoline-fed welding machine is advisable for refrigeration and air conditioning electrical shop, automotive shop and goldsmith bracing joints of copper tubes and soldering of splitter and joints.  It is also for repair of leaks, broken and joints of clutch, steering wheels and brake piping systems of automobiles.  And finally for broken gold jewelry repairs, gold smithing and welding of gold bars.

 

Analysis on the Strength of 5” CHB with Oyster Shell
as Component of the Aggregates

Alfredo R. Rabena, Ph.D.
Nelia V. Aman, Ed.D.

Abstract

This study explored the possibility of using oyster shells as component of aggregates in the production of 5” CHB by determining its compressive strength and comparing this to the strength of 5” CHB taken from the construction site.

Twelve (12) samples using different proportions were produced by researchers and another three (3) samples were taken from the construction.

All the samples brought to the testing laboratory are below the required compressive strength for non-load bearing concrete hollow blocks. However, it is noteworthy that the samples with oyster shells have higher compressive strength compared with the samples taken from the construction site.

It was also found out that the lesser the number of pieces of CHB produced the higher is the compressive strength.

There are also significant differences among and between the 5” CHB produced using different proportions including the samples taken from the construction site.

 

The Information and Communication Technology Capabilities of Local Government Units of the Second District of Ilocos Sur

 

Milagros R. Remular, Ed.D.

 

Abstract

This research work ascertained the capability or readiness of some local government units of the second district of Ilocos Sur along Computer and Information Technology in terms of computer equipments and facilities and manpower resources during the year 2007.

                This study made use of the  descriptive comparative methods of research with the questionnaire as a means of gathering data from 66 department heads and 146 personnel as respondents from the 10 sample local government units broken down into five lowland municipalities, four interior or upland municipalities, and one city.

                There were more female than male personnel and department heads; most of them were college graduate. Majority of the department heads were 36 years old and above while most of the personnel belonged to the 26-35 years old bracket.
                                                                                                                                                                        The sample municipalities had computer units, most of which are Pentium I to IV,  and had a computer printer, most of which are dot matrix although there were some desk jet or inkjet. Some offices in the municipalities were not provided with printers. One lowland municipality and a city had other computer peripherals like scanner, digital camera, modem and CD writer.

                The personnel and department heads in both lowland and interior municipalities considered themselves “Good” on knowledge of computer, while the personnel and department heads in the city had “Very Good” level on knowledge of computer.

                The personnel and department heads in the lowland and department heads in interior municipalities were “Good” while the personnel in interior municipalities were “Poor” in using Microsoft Word application software. On the other hand, the personnel and department heads in the city were “Very Good” in using the same application software.

The personnel and department heads of both lowland and interior municipalities and the department heads of the city government had “Good” level, while the personnel in the city were “Very Good” in using the MS Excel application software.

The personnel and department heads in both lowland and interior municipalities were “Poor” while the personnel and department heads in the city were “Good” in using internet.

The level of knowledge of computer and level of internet usage of both personnel and department heads in the lowland and interior municipalities differ significantly from those in the city. City group had the highest mean rating and interior group had the lowest mean rating.

                With regards to the level of using the Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel, the three pairs of personnel: Interior and Lowland; Interior and City; and Lowland and City differ significantly, with city personnel having the highest mean and personnel from the interior municipalities having the lowest mean. In the case of the department heads, the level of using the Microsoft Word of those from the interior and lowland municipalities differ significantly from those in the City.

                Based on the findings and conclusions, the following are recommended: 1)  Everytime the Local Government Units prepare their budget, the budget officer should allocate amount for purchase of computer units or the employees may look for generous donors in case the budget of the local government is not suffered;  2)  The personnel and department heads should practice using the application software and try exploring while using the software;  3)   The personnel especially in the lowlan, and interior municipalities need to undergo training along Microsoft Excel and use of Internet, and the department heads should find time to attend training on advanced I.T. like Microsoft PowerPoint; and  4) The Local Government Units should include in their Municipal Development Plans how they can improve and advance along Information and Communication Technology, particularly their connection to the World Wide Web.

 

Linguistic Errors in the Oral Expositions of Speech Communication Students of the College of Teacher Education in the University of Northern Philippines

Rommel V. Tabula, MAT

 

Abstract

The study generally examined the linguistic errors in the oral expositions of Speech Communication students of the College of Teacher Education in the University of Northern Philippines.  It investigated and described: (1) the profile of the respondents according to sex, course, type of high school graduated from, geographical location, parents’ educational attainment, parents’ work status, language used at home, and exposure to mass media; (2) the linguistic errors committed by the respondents in their oral expositions; (3) the strategies of the students in monitoring their linguistic errors; (4) the significant relationship between the profile of the students and their linguistic errors; (5) the significant relationship between the profile and the strategies of the students in monitoring their linguistic errors; and (6) the significant difference in the linguistic errors between and among the group of respondents.

Data were obtained from forty (40) Teacher Education students, who were enrolled in Speech Communication and Debate during the First Semester of the Academic Year 2009-2010.  Descriptive method of investigation in evaluating the linguistic errors of the students was employed.  From the tape recorded speeches of the respondents, their linguistic errors and strategies in monitoring those errors were listened, transcribed and analyzed using the following statistical tools: frequency and percentages, weighted mean, point biserial correlation, chi-square test, and analysis of variance. 

Results revealed that majority of the respondents are female; equal number of students from the four curricular offerings of the college participated in the study; a great number of them graduated from the public high schools; many are residents in the rural areas; most of their parents have finished college and self-employed; the language they frequently use at home is Iloko; and they are moderately exposed to print media but highly exposed to electronic media. It also revealed that the linguistic errors committed by the respondents in their oral expositions are phonological and grammatical in nature; in terms of phonology, they committed errors in vowel sounds and consonant quality; and in terms of grammar, their errors are mostly morphological and the least is lexical. It further disclosed that the strategy used by the respondents in monitoring their phonological errors is self-correction; and in grammatical errors, the strategies used were stammering, restructuring, and verbosity. Furthermore, it was found out that in phonology, there exists a significant relationship with regard to type of high school graduated from, geographical location, course, parents’ educational attainment, parents’ work status, language used at home, and exposure to mass media; and in Grammar, there exists a significant difference with regard to geographical location, course, parents’ work status, language used at home, and exposure to electronic media.  Moreover, there was a significant relationship between the strategy in monitoring phonological errors and sex, type of high school graduated from, course, parents’ educational attainment, parents’ work status, language used at home, and exposure to mass media; and between the strategies in monitoring grammatical errors and the type of high school graduated from, course, parents’ educational attainment, parents’ work status, language used at home, and exposure to electronic media.  It was also noted that there was also a significant difference in the linguistic errors between and among the groups of respondents.

Based from the conclusions, the following recommendations were forwarded:  since learning a language will preferably be acquired in early years of schooling, a good program in the elementary level with regard to teaching students on the articulation of sounds should be considered; the language curriculum of the college and of the university should be reviewed and revised to conform with relevant theories exposed in communicative competence; English subjects should be made relevant to the needs of the students; the teachers should employ communicative approaches, methods and techniques to ensure the competent use of the English language among Teacher Education students; and similar studies should be undertaken to generalize the findings of the study.

 

Self-Concept of the Bachelor of Science in Social Work Students of the University of Northern Philippines

Aurora R. Quero, MAEd

 

Abstract

This study endeavored to determine the level of self-concept of the social work students of the University of Northern Philippines.  It utilized the descriptive method of research with a questionnaire as the main data gathering instrument.

The research involved 73 social work students from first year to fourth year, during the second semester of school year 2007-2008.

The respondents who mostly studied at public high schools reside in the rural areas.  They come from low income families comprising of 3-4 children.   Their parents have a low level of educational attainment. 

The self-concept of the students was found out to be at a “high” level.  Year level and mothers’ education were noted to significantly contribute to the self-concept of the students.

Majority of the social work students who completed their secondary education at public high schools belong to low income families comprising of 3-4 children where both parents had low level of educational attainment. Furthermore, social work students who are mostly from the rural areas belong to closely knit families.

Social work students have high regards of themselves. They have strong faith in the Almighty, are more or less contented with themselves and show concern for the welfare of others. However, as normal beings just like anyone else they sometimes fall short of expected conduct.

The social work students’ self-concept is highly influenced by their year level and their mother’s education. Indeed moving on to a higher level of learning is vital and instrumental to self-development. Mothers on the other hand, remain to be the most influential figure in the person’s life.

The following recommendations are forwarded:  1) In order to further enhance the social work students’ self-concept, the college of social work in cooperation with the university guidance center and the social work students’ organization should plan for appropriate student development activities;    2) Faculty advisers in cooperation with subject teachers should continuously monitor the development of the students. This way, appropriate measure can be undertaken to ward off the existence of more serious student problems; and                   3) A study on the relationship between self concept and emotional quotient be made as an offshoot of this investigation.

 

Self-Concept of Physically Handicapped Students

Aurelia T. Vitamog, Ed.D.
Rolando B. Navarro, Ed.D.
Remedios R. Navarro, Ph.D.

 

Abstract

It is a common knowledge that knowing oneself has become a great concern among the youth which includes the physically handicapped individuals. A physical handicap is considered as a drawback in attaining maximum achievement in school. For this reason, the study aimed to determine the level of self-concept of the 56 physically challenged students  in nine secondary schools in the Province of Ilocos Sur both public and private institutions.

This study utilized a descriptive correlational method of research.  The researchers made use of a three way process in which a survey was initially employed to reach out the potential respondents of the investigation. After having been identified the respondents, an interview was conducted, then, followed by the administration of the instrument.

The interview was done at the Principal’s and Guidance Counselor’s Offices.  The primary data gathering tool used in the study was adopted from the instrument employed by Tobia (1992) in her study, the Pasao’s Self-Concept Rating Scale. The said Rating Scale measured ten indicators: “not-me”, emotionality, goal directedness, accepting attitudes, family relations, peer relations, identity, self-feeling, personal worth and self-confidence

The overall scores obtained by the respondents in the Rating Scale were interpreted as either positive or negative using the norm set by Pasao with a reference mean of 334.

Findings of the study showed that females have higher incidence of physical abnormalities than males. Most of them are Roman Catholics, the eldest children, enrolled as second-year students and with three siblings in the family. They considered themselves as sports minded individuals.

 Majority of the respondents have visual irregularities. They also claimed that such abnormalities are congenital in nature.

Results, likewise, revealed that all the ten indicators of self-concept taken singly and as a whole yielded mean score below the norm. This means that the respondents have a negative impression or project a poor self-concept about themselves.

 

The Effectiveness of the Extension Programs of the
University of Northern Philippines
School Year  2005–2008

Lauro B. Tacbas, Ph.D.
Mariana P. De Vera, Ed.D.
Necy Cesaria V. Romo, Ed.D.

 

Abstract

This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of the extension programs of the University of Northern Philippines in the different adopted schools and communities in the First and Second Districts of the Province of Ilocos Sur.

The respondents of the study were the administrators and clientele of the different communities where programs and projects of the UNP Extension Services Office were being implemented during the School Year 2005 – 2008, namely: Teppeng, Sinait; Guimod, San Juan; Manzante, Magsingal; Lao-ingen, Lussoc and Sived, Sto. Domingo; San Vicente; Sta. Catalina; Lidlidda; San Emilio; and Suyo in the Province of Ilocos Sur.

The study made used of the descriptive survey method of research to describe and analyze the existing situation about the effectiveness of the extension programs of the university.

 In order to attain the objectives of the study, the following statistical tools were used: mean, frequency count and percentages, standard deviation, and Pearson Product Moment of Correlation.

On the basis of the findings, the researchers forwarded the following conclusions: The administrative capability of the UNP Extension Services Office in terms of executive leadership, personnel capability, and financial capability is “High.” The extent of participation of the development partners in extension services and the extent of implementation of the extension programs of the UNP Extension Services Office in terms of mission, goals and objectives and execution of the criteria in the selection of service area for Extension Services Program (Adopt-a-Community and School Program) are also “High.”  Moreover, the program outputs of the UNP Extension Services Office in terms of Skills Training, Information Drive, Medical/Dental Mission and Livelihood Organizations are “High”

In terms of the economic and social impacts of the programs of the UNP Extension Services Office, out of 188 respondents, 114 or 60.64 percent believed that they were not employed as a result of the skills learned, only 74 or 39.36 percent believed to be employed. Most (123 or 65.42%) of them perceived that their houses were not improved as a result of the income derived from the income generated after the training. It can also be traced that 112 or 59.57 percent of the respondents believed that they were not able to buy appliances as a result of the income generated from the employment as a result of the skills learned. On the contrary, the respondents perceived that their social status have improved in terms of self-esteem, health and nutrition, and environment.

There is a significant relationship between the extent of implementation of the program of the UNP Extension Services Office and administrative capability and participation of development partners;  level of program outputs and impact of the program except for house and appliances.

Based on the findings and conclusions, the following recommendations were presented by the researchers: The “high” level of administrative capability of the UNP Extension Services Office in terms of executive leadership, personnel capability, and financial capability; the extent of participation of the development partners in extension services; of the extent of implementation of the extension programs of the UNP Extension Services Office in terms of mission, goals and objectives and execution of the criteria in the selection of service area for Extension Services Program (Adopt-a-Community and School Program); of program outputs of the UNP Extension Services Office in terms of Skills Training, Information Drive, Medical/Dental Mission and Livelihood Organizations should still be sustained or improved.  The economic and social impacts of the programs of the UNP Extension Services should also be improved. For an intent periodic assessment of the effectiveness of the Extension Program of the University of Northern Philippines, another study on the status of the Extension Program focusing on the improvement of its role as development partners of the community should be conducted.

 

 

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